What you should know

The NDIS and SDA

In 2011, the Productivity Commission estimated that around 28,000 people (or 6% of NDIS participants) will require SDA funding at full scheme. Prior to the launch of the NDIS, it was estimated that there was enough existing specialist accommodation for 15,700 people, implying a growing need for new dwellings to accommodate an additional 12,300 participants.

Due to funding shortfalls and therefore the need to reduce the cost of individual support, many of the 28,000 people requiring this level of support have lived at home with families as carers, or in group homes, aged care or hospital.

The NDIS is committed to ensuring SDA provides homes for people with very high needs and not just simply a building in which to live. This includes limiting the number of residents per house to a maximum of five in a single dwelling.

SDA Program housing models are providing new ways of reducing support costs and providing access to shared supports, maximising independence, choice and control for the person in receipt of SDA Funding.

SDA homes range from purpose-built apartments in mixed developments, through to modified free-standing houses.

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Frequently asked questions

What is the NDIS?

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is the Australian Government’s new system for supporting people with disabilities, developed around two core principles:

- giving eligible people better choice and control over their funding and supports;
- helping them reach their goals through reasonable and necessary supports. (Necessary means something a person must have, not a ‘want’ or a luxury).

The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is an independent statutory agency who’s role is to implement the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Some people with very high needs require special accommodation that enables them to receive the supports they need. The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) refers to this as Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA). SDA is not housing for all people with a disability; it only caters for those that need a specialist housing solution.

Participants who are assessed as needing SDA as part of their reasonable and necessary supports will receive funding to cover the costs of SDA.

The SDA program is intended to improve the choice and control over housing options for people with disability. This funding is made available through the National Disability Insurance Scheme and is included in a person’s with disability “participants plan”.

The NDIS is committed to ensuring SDA provides homes for people with very
high needs and not just simply a building in which to live. This includes limiting
the number of residents per house to a maximum of five in a single dwelling.

SDA Program housing models are providing new ways of reducing support
costs and providing access to shared supports, maximising independence,
choice and control for the person in receipt of SDA Funding.

SDA homes range from purpose-built apartments in mixed developments,
through to modified free-standing houses.

The Bricks and Mortar housing responsibility for the 94% of people with disability who do not get SDA funding, sits with the state/territory governments (except for home modifications).
• These participants may be funded for housing options investigation, broad information and advice provision and/or home modifications.
• Under the NDIS, the support that people with disability will receive to help them live independently in the community will include building their capacity to maintain a tenancy and support for behaviour management.
• If you have Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA) as a component of your NDIS support plan, you are not eligible for social housing

There are lots of people doing lots of interesting things in this space – we want to share, what we know, with you. So you can do interesting things too!

This is the expression we use to describe, the way you combine your decisions on:
• Where you want to live,
• What type of property you want to live in: house | unit | Townhouse
• Who you want to live with, if anyone
• Who owns the property and
• Who manages the property
• Mixed with the level and type of personal support you will need,
the funding you get from the NDIA
• Any support you can get from the community
• The amount you can pay in rent or a mortgage

• New SDA Projects – currently in development
• Traditional Shared Living models – now with SDA funding
• Social Housing including Community, Public and Affordable Housing
• Private Rental – Independent or Shared Living – without SDA
• Private Ownership ie own home or With Family in family home
• Some innovative, equity and cooperative models that are being developed and/or reinvented under the NDIS
• Using your SDA money to buy or build your own home.

Successful contemporary housing models facilitate:

• Independence, Privacy and Autonomy
• An ordinary life
• Community connection and inclusion
• Innovative support arrangements

Successful contemporary housing models are high in:

• Amenity (transport, facilities, location)
• Quality
• Accessibility
• Diversity